Q and A With Dr. Cooper on the Tom Joyner Morning Show


Q and A

With

Dr. Cooper on the Tom Joyner Morning Show

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2016

Question:

My heart disease is attributed to sleep apnea. Taking blood pressure and water pills for my heart. Now using CPAC machine. Will I ever be able to stop the medications?

Answer:

Probably not, but you can perhaps reduce the need for meds with exercise and weight loss. Sleep apnea is one of many risk factors for heart disease. It is not the only one. What is your weight? Are you exercising? Do you smoke? These too are risk factors and should be controlled if you are to reduce the need for medications.

Q:

My dad was recently diagnose (d) with astemic (ischemic) heart disease. What is that?

A:

ISCHEMIC heart disease is another term for atherosclerotic heart disease. It just means a lack of blood flow and oxygen due to build up of plaque in the arteries.

Q:

How significant are calcium scores? Do you believe in them since most insurance companies will not pay for them?

A:

CT scans can detect calcium build up in the wall of arteries. It just means you are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Insurance does not pay for them for a number of reasons but I can’t speculate one specifically.

Q:

Is smoking related to heart disease?

A:

ABSOLUTELY!

Q:

My dad had 2 open hearts. Currently Has a defibrillator And I can’t tell you how many stents. He was recommended to have a heart transplant He is70….
he looks pretty strong. But I wonder how dangerous is this procedure?

A:

ALL surgeries carry some risk. It is a matter of assessing your specific risk versus the potential benefit in lifestyle and quality of life.

Are there signs of heart disease? Shortness of breath, palpitations, chest pain, swelling in the hands or feet, just to name a few.

Q:

I have a family history of diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. I am 68. With exercise and diet I have been able to elude the first 2. It doesn’t seem to help lower the cholesterol. I can’t take statins. What else can I do?

A:

Think about increasing fiber in your diet.

Q:

With heart disease in my family, what kinds of exercise do you recommend to help combat the disease for me?

A:

30 minutes at maximum heart rate- 220-age for men multiplied by 0.85 for women, 6 days a week.

Q:

What causes you to have A Fib?

A:

Heart disease, caffeine, smoking, obesity, alcohol to name a few.

Q:

How many days/weeks/months of CONSISTENT cardio exercise is needed to jump start your heart to a healthy condition?

A:

30 minutes at maximum heart rate- 220-age for men multiplied by 0.85 for women, 6 days a week.

Q:

What are some NATURAL super foods 4 ur ‘d?

A:

No such thing. Just eat healthy, clean, largely plant-based diet and that is all you need.

Q:

I have a soon to be 37 year old niece who was diagnosed and treated for
hypertension starting at the age of 9, is that an indicator of heart disease and are there statistics available about the occurrence of heart disease in children?

A:

GREAT QUESTION! This is a big issue and one that parents should not take lightly. Go to the American Heart Association website: heart.org and the American Academy of Pediatrics website for more information on this topic. High blood pressure is one of many forms of the generalized term cardiovascular disease.

Q:

I’m a 49 year old female that exercises regularly. I ‘ve been tracking my resting heart rate with my fitbit and noticed it goes from 68 up to upper 70s when I’m not doing a lot of cardio, is it normal to fluctuate?

A:

Only 68 with cardio? That’s unusual. I’m assuming you mean 170 perhaps; this would be a normal response to exercise. A low heart rate during maximum cardio is NOT good. If that is the case get it checked out immediately.

Q:

I recently had an EKG done as part of mypre-op for knee replacement surgery, results are lower chamber not firing as quickly as it should. I was told there is no concern. Should I be concerned?

A:

Need more context, but make sure you get another opinion.

Q:

What is considered a healthy resting heart rate for women in my age range
(49) I’m not doing a lot of cardio, is it normal to fluctuate?

A:

Yes it does. and resting heart rate can be anywhere from 50s to 100, but no lower or higher in most normal people and yes it can fluctuate.

Q:

Been having back and knee pain that makes walking stressed. Last night was awakened several times from heavy heart beating. Scared me.
Are there any cardiology resources for those with no insurance? Was very active in tennis and bowling, speed walking. =1 didn’t know.

A:

Yes, check with your local public health or county health service. There is always someone willing to help.

Q:

I have glaucoma. I take eyedrops that have a beta blocker in it. Can this cause me to have heart problems if I’ve never had heart problems

No.

Is a-fib and heart mumur the same?

A:

No. Afib is an irregularity of the heart beat. A MURMUR is noise heard during the heart beat.

Q:

I’m a 38-yr old female who started experiencing anxiety attacks last year.
What affect, if any, can this have on heart health?

A:

Many health effects of anxiety and stress, particularly, high blood pressure and coronary artery disease. I recommend getting intense treatment for this condition.

Q:

If I am alone and have a heart attack, is there anything I can do, or take, to help save myself? Besides call 911. I have a family history of heart attacks ( brothers, dad, both grandfathers). I’m a black female, 61, with high blood pressure and cholesterol under control with meds, caregiver for 90 year old dad.
My grandkids keep me smiling n I take lots of real n mini vacations to lower stress.

A:

YES, In my book, HEART ATTACK: TRUTH, TRAGEDY, TRIUMPH, the last chapter discusses what to do when a heart attack hits you. Check it out on my website: www.drcoopmd.com.

.
Q:

Dr. Cooper, thank you for your commitment to eradicating heart disease that’s due to (or complicated by) poor lifestyle choices. Can you shed
some light on having an ‘enlarged heart’? i.e. What is it and what can a person do about it?

A:

YES, In my book, HEART ATTACK: TRUTH, TRAGEDY, TRIUMPH, the chapter on “Heart A Tactics” addresses this issue and many others related to heart disease and an enlarged heart. Check it out on my website:www.drcoopmd.com.

Q:

I live in Atlanta and a 47 yr. Black man and need to see a Dr. Where is Dr. William Cooper’s practice so I can become a client as well as get checked out . It’s been a few years since I have had a physical

 

A:

61 Whitcher St, Suite 4100, Marietta, GA 30060.  For appointment call 770-590-4180.

 

 

Q:

Hi Dr. I’ve been on the following meds: Lisinopril & HCTZ for 5 yrs. I work a 12 hr. shift. ( I walk 2 times a week-5 miles) Do you think at some point I will be able to get off of these meds?

 

A:

I doubt it.  But you can keep the dosage low with good choices. I am on the same meds, I work, basically 24/7.  I exercise 5-6 times per week regularly,  I have a good nutrition plan, I don’t smoke and I maintain a healthy weight and I am still on high blood pressure meds.  My blood pressure is UNDER CONTROL, that’s the important point.  There is no cure for primary high blood pressure, but there is CONTROL. 

 

Be Well! 

COOP OUT!!

 


2 thoughts on “Q and A With Dr. Cooper on the Tom Joyner Morning Show”

  1. Thanks for the information on heart disease. My father had a heart attack and stroke at the same time. Is this hereditary? I gain weight when I turn 40. What should I do to make sure I’m not going to have a heart attack?

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